Language name and locationː Orokaiva, Papua New Guinea [Refer to Ethnologue]

言名称和分布地区奥罗凯瓦语, 巴布亚新几内亚奥罗省

 

1. vahai (lit: ''one'')

2. heriso (lit: ''two'')

3. nei heriso nei vahai (lit: ''and two and one'')

4. nei heriso nei heriso (lit: ''and two and two'')

5. inɡeni vahai (litː ''hand one'')

6. inɡeni vahai nei vahai (litː ''hand one and one'')

7. inɡeni vahai nei heriso

8. inɡeni vahai nei heriso nei vahai

9. inɡeni vahai nei heriso nei heriso

10. inɡeni heriso (litː ''hands two'')

11. nei heriso nei vahai (litː ''hands two, and one'')

12. nei heriso nei heriso

13. nei heriso nei heriso nei vahai

14. nei heriso nei heriso nei heriso

15. inɡeni heriso nei vahai [litː ''hands two and one (foot)''] or inɡeni nei eto utu

     vahai (''hands two and foot one'') *

16. inɡeni heriso nei vahai, nei vahai [litː ''hands two and one (foot), plus one'']

17. inɡeni heriso nei vahai, nei neriso

18. inɡeni heriso nei vahai, nei neriso, nei vahai

19. inɡeni heriso nei vahai, nei neriso, nei neriso

20. inɡeni heriso nei to utu heriso (litː ''hands two and feet two'') or ''inɡeni nei heriso

      eto utu heriso''. *

 

Linguist providing data and dateː Mr. Bud Larsen. SIL International, Papua New Guinea. June 13, 2011.

供资料的语言学家: Mr. Bud Larsen, 2011 年 6 月 13 日.

 

Other comments: Orokaiva has a digit-tally system with a basic numeral set (1, 2), 3 and 4 have the constructions ''2 plus 1'' and ''2 plus 2'', respectively. The number words for 5 and 10 ''hand one'' and ''hands two'' respectively. Number 6 means ''hand one and one'', when a person shows the numbers with their hands they would show a fist with one hand and the thumb in the palm of the other hand. But the word for thumb is ''ingeni siro'' meaning ''head finger''. Numbers 6 to 9 would all be said with the word ''vahai'' after ''ingeni''. For example, 7 would be ''ingeni vahai nei heriso''. Or ''one hand and two''. Number 15 can be expressed by either ''inɡeni heriso nei vahai'', literally means ''hands two and one (foot)'' or ''inɡeni nei eto utu vahai'', 'hands two and foot one', but more commonly, people say ''inɡeni heriso nei vahai''. 20 can be expressed by either ''inɡeni heriso nei to utu heriso'', literallyː 'hands two and feet two' or ''inɡeni nei heriso eto utu heriso''. Note that the 'v' is voiced bilateral fricative. The word ''nei'' could be translated, 'in addition' or 'plus'.  The word ''eto'' connects two equal segments, such as ''and''. Or it could be translated ''and then''.


                            

Back >> [ Home ] [ Trans-New-Guinea ]