Language name and location: Chak (Cak), Bangladesh [Refer to Ethnologue]

言名称和分布地区查克语, 孟加拉

 

1. hvú-wa / táiʔ ( Cak-Marma forms)

21.  húŋ-íŋ-hvú-wa / náiʔcʰé-táiʔ

2. níŋ-hvú / náiʔ

22.  húŋ-íŋ-níŋ-hvú / náiʔcʰé-náiʔ

3. súŋ-hvú / súŋ

23.  húŋ-íŋ-súŋ-hvú / náiʔcʰé-súŋ

4. prɨ́-hvu / lé

24.  húŋ-íŋ-prɨ́-hvu / náiʔcʰé-lé

5. ŋá-hvu / ŋá

25.  húŋ-íŋ-ŋá-hvu / náiʔcʰé-ŋá

6. kruʔ-hvu / kʰróʔ

26.  húŋ-íŋ-kruʔ-hvu / náiʔcʰé-kʰróʔ

7. səniŋ-hvu / kʰənáiʔ

27.  húŋ-íŋ-səniŋ-hvu / náiʔcʰé-kʰənáiʔ

8. acaiʔ-hvu / ʃáiʔ

28.  húŋ-íŋ-acaiʔ-hvu / náiʔcʰé-ʃáiʔ

9. təhvú-hvu /kó

29.  húŋ-íŋ-təhvú-hvu / náiʔcʰé-kó

10. sɨ́-hvu / cʰe

30.  súŋ-jɨ́ / súŋcʰe

11. sɨ́-íŋ-hvú-wa / təcʰé-táiʔ

40.  prɨ́-jɨ́ / lécʰe

12. sɨ́-íŋ-níŋ-hvú / təcʰé-náiʔ

50.  ŋá-jɨ́ / ŋácʰe

13. sɨ́-íŋ-súŋ-hvú / təcʰé-súŋ

60.  kruʔ-jɨ́  / kʰróʔcʰe

14. sɨ́-íŋ-prɨ́-hvu / təcʰé-lé

70.  səniŋ-jɨ́ / kʰənáiʔcʰe

15. sɨ́-íŋ-ŋá-hvu / təcʰé-ŋá

80.  acaiʔ-jɨ́ / ʃáiʔcʰe

16. sɨ́-íŋ-kruʔ-hvu / təcʰé-kʰróʔ

90.  təhvú-jɨ́ / kócʰe

17. sɨ́-íŋ-səniŋ-hvu / təcʰé-kʰənáiʔ

100. tərá

18. sɨ́-íŋ-acaiʔ-hvu / təcʰé-ʃáiʔ

200.            náiʔra ( Cak-Marma form)

19. sɨ́-íŋ-təhvú-hvu / təcʰé-kó

1000. tʰóŋ-na / tətʰóŋ ( Cak-Marma form)

20. húŋ

2000.            náitʰóŋ ( Cak-Marma form)

 

Linguist providing data and dateː Dr. Huziwara Keisuke, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan, January 11, 2007.

供资料的语言学家: 藤原敬介博士 (日本京都大学), 2007 年 1 月 11 日.

 

Other comments: Chak or Cak has a decimal system. The Chak language was previously regarded as an unclassified language, but now has been classified as a Luish language. The Chak use two sets of numeral systems, an indigenous numeral system, in which the numerals are always used with a classified, here the common classifier -hvú is used, the other one is borrowed from the Marma or Arakanese language , and called Cak-Marma numerals (the second column) are more often used in numbers beyond ten. 

Cak
– Linguistic affiliation: Luish group of Tibeto-Burman language family
– Region: Chittagong Hill Tracts(Cak), Rakhain State(Sak)
– Population: 2000 in Bangladesh(BBS 2002)
– Previous studies: L¨O FFLER(1963, 1964), L. BERNOT(1966, 1967: 227-
255), LUCE(1985) etc.
– Phonological inventory (HUZIWARA 2002: modified)
  consonants: /p, ph, b, t, th, d, c*1, ch*², j*², k, kh, g, ʔ(as final only), ɓ, ɗ, v, s, ʃ, h, m,

   n, ŋ, l, r, w, y/
- vowels: /i, e, ai*⁴, a, o, u, i, ɯ, ə/
- tonemes: high tone (marked by an acute accent), low tone (not marked)

 

 *1 Generally [ts], but often [tɕ] in borrowings from Marma.
 *2 Generally [tsʰ], but often [tɕʰ] in borrowings from Marma.
 *3 Generally [dz], but sometimes [dʑ], especially before /a/, /aiʔ/ and /aiŋ/.
 *4 /e/ and /ai/ are almost in complementary distribution: /e/ generally appears only

     in open syllable, while /ai/ in closed syllable. But there do exist some words with

     /e/ followed by /ʔ/, such as /heʔ/, /neʔ/, /séʔ/ and so on. Incidentally they all are

    grammatical particles. /ai/ is often pronounced as [ɛ(ʔ)] before /ʔ/. Quasi-minimal

    pair is as follows.
    (i) a. /siŋ heʔ/ “it’s cold (lit. cold-PRED)”
        b. /siŋ-háiʔ/ “winter (lit. cold-season)”


                            

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