Language name and location: Alamblak, Papua New Guinea [Refer to Ethnologue]

言名称和分布地区阿兰布拉克语, 巴布亚新几内亚塞皮克山区

 

1. rbas

2. hutf

3. hurtfi rbas (litː ''two and one'')

4. hurtfi hurtfi   (litː ''two and two'' )

5. rbas sirs   (litː ''one hand'' )

6. rbas sirsi rbas (litː ''one hand' and one'' )

7. rbas sirsi hutf

8. rbas sirsi hurtfi rbas

9. rbas sirsi hurtfi hurtfi

10. hut sirf  (litː ''two hands'' )

11. hut sirfi rbas (litː ''two hands and one'' )
12. hut sirfi hutf
13. hut sirfi hutfi rbas
14. hut sirfi hutfi hutfi
15. hut sirfi rba wras (litː ''two hands and one foot '')
16. hut sirfi rba wrasi rbas (litː ''two hands and one foot and one'')
17. hut sirfi rba wrasi hutf
18. hut sirfi rba wrasi hutfi rbas
19. hut sirfi rba wrasi hutfi hutfi
20. yuht yimar  (lit: ''whole man'' )
21. twenti wan ......

 

Linguist providing data and dateː Mr. Brian Holmquist, NTM (New Tribes Mission), Papua New Guinea. September 13, 2011.

提供资的语言: Mr. Brian Holmquist, 2011 年 9 月 13 日.

 

Other comments: The data is from Bagwido dialect of Alamlak language in the Sepik Region, they do not use this system any more. Perhaps they use it for 1-5. Other than that, they just use the English/ Pidgin English counting system. This has all changed over the past decade.

Here is a basic description of the number system: rba (one), sirs (hand), wras (leg),

yuht yimar (one whole man = 20)

Phonetic guide:

H  (voiced velar fricative/ voiceless when word initial or word final)

F  (voiced bilabial fricative/ voiceless when word initial or word final)

Schwa  occurs between any and all consonants which naturally require a pause. We do not write the schwa in our language.

So, using the word “hutf,” it would really be (voiceless velar fricative followed by the “oo” (as in shoot) followed by the t followed by a schwa followed by a voiceless bilabial fricative)

The numbers from 20 and beyond are all in Pidgin English because that is how they say those numbers.


Language name and location: Alamblak, Papua New Guinea [Refer to Ethnologue]

语言名称和分布地区: 阿兰布拉克语, 巴布亚新几内亚塞皮克山区

 

1. ɾɨpɑ

2. xɤʂ

3. xɤʂβiɾɨpɑ  (litː ''two and one'')

4. xɤʂβixɤʂ   (litː ''two and two'' )

5. tiɾʏoɣɨt     (litː ''whole hand'' )

6. tiɾʏoɣɨt wom tiɾtɣɤ ɾɨpɑ (litː ''whole hand' and another hand's one'' )

7. tiɾʏoɣɨt wom tiɾtɣɤ xɤʂ  (litː ''whole hand' and another hand's two'' )
8. tiɾʏoɣɨt wom tiɾtɣɤ xɤʂβiɾɨpɑ (litː ''whole hand' and another hand's two and one'' )
9. tiɾʏoɣɨt wom tiɾtɣɤ xɤʂβixɤʂ (litː ''whole hand' and another hand's two and two'' )
10. tiɾxɤʂ   (litː ''two hands'' )
11. tiɾxɤʂ wom tiɾtɣɤ ɾɨpɑ (litː ''two hands and another hand's one'' )
12. tiɾxɤʂ wom tiɾtɣɤ  xɤʂ
13. tiɾxɤʂ wom tiɾtɣɤ xɤʂβiɾɨpɑ  
14. tiɾxɤʂ wom tiɾtɣɤ xɤʂβixɤʂ
15. tiɾxɤʂ wom tiɾtɣɤ tiɾʏoɣɨt  
20. ɾpɑ ʏimɑʏoxt  (lit: ''whole person'' )

 

Linguist providing data and dateː Mr. Patrick Edmiston. SIL International, June 8, 2010.

提供资的语言: Mr. Patrick Edmiston, 2010 年 6 月 8 日.

 

Other comments: There is a men's and a women's tally system in Alamblak, both reported to be borrowed from the Maramuni people. Both are based on body part tallying. The women's tally system (the one traditionally used by women ) is unusual in that women's tally systems have not been reported elsewhere in Papua New Guinea,

and secondly for its inclusion of two low points ( the breasts ) to the exclusion of points on the faces. The above is the men's tally system, which was reported borrowed

from the Marumuni. It is not used for counting objects. It is also no longer in use and has not been for a long time. Rarely done above 10, but would ''two hands and another hand's one''. Twenty is 'whole person'', implying 2 hands and 2 feet.


Language name and location: Alamblak, Papua New Guinea [Refer to Ethnologue]

言名称和分布地区阿兰布拉克语, 巴布亚新几内亚塞皮克山区

 

1. kambrə piɲaf-r  (litː ''little finger'' )

2. bona piɲaf-r (litː ''ring finger'' )

3. rɨkuyakwənt-r (litː ''middle finger'' )

4. nəŋritkom-r (litː ''index finger'' )

5. mɨma piɲaf-r (litː ''thumb'' )

6. wafi-t ( (litː ''palm'' )

7. ɡramtip-t (litː ''forearm'')
8. tirŋənha-t (litː ''outer elbow'' )
9. bohdəbi-t (litː ''biceps'')
10. briŋa-t (litː ''shoulder'' )
11. reŋom-t (litː ''nexk muscle'' )
12. məhŋənha-t (litː ''side of neck'' )
13. yimbindaŋ-t (litː ''ear'' )
14. ɲiŋa-r (lit: ''eye'' )
15. kusm-t (lit: ''nose'' )
.

 

Linguist providing data and dateː Dr. Les Bruce, SIL International, April 25, 1997.

提供资的语言: Dr. Les Bruce, 1997 年 4 月 25 日.

 

Other comments: There is a men's and a women's tally system in Alamblak, both reported to be borrowed from the Maramuni people. Both are based on body part tallying. The women's tally system (the one traditionally used by women) is unusual

in that women's tally systems have not been reported elsewhere in Papua New Guinea,

and secondly for its inclusion of two low points ( the breasts ) to the exclusion of

points on the faces. For both systems, each point in the system corresponds to body part which is named by the same term as that used in counting. Both systems are initiated with the little finger on the left hand, and they are symmetrical in that the last point is the little finger on the right hand. The tally systems are no longer regularly used except by the oldest members of the society. They are still readily recalled by the thirty-five year old and above age group, although there is some variation between speakers on the number of points included in the men's tally system. The men's system which was common to most of the men questioned is illustrated above. Numbers 16 through 29,  which are the same body part term as number 14 through one, are qualified with a relator: mkukor or manakor other side.


                            

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